Mercury is one of the most toxic substances commonly encountered,
and according to government agencies, causes adverse health

effects in large numbers of people in the U.S. The extreme
toxicity of mercury can be seen from documented
effects on wildlife by very low levels
of mercury exposure.

 The Reproductive System, Fertility and Mercury

Mercury accumulates in the ovaries, testes, and prostate gland:

In addition to having estrogenic effects, mercury has other documented hormonal effects including effects on the reproductive system resulting in lowered sperm counts, defective sperm cells, damaged DNA, aberrant chromosome numbers rather than the normal 46, chromosome breaks, and lowered testosterone levels in males and menstrual disturbances and infertility in women.

Nickel has also been found to accumulate in the prostate and be related to prostate cancer. Mercury has been found to cause decreased sperm volume and motility, increased sperm abnormalities and spontaneous abortions, increased uterine fibroids/endometriosis, and decreased fertility in animals and in humans. In studies of women having miscarriages or birth defects, husbands were found to typically have low sperm counts and significantly more visually abnormal sperm.

It’s now estimated that up to 85% of the sperm produced by a healthy male is DNA-damaged. Abnormal sperm is also blamed for a global increase in testicular cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive conditions. Studies indicate an increase in the rate of spontaneous abortions with an increasing concentration of mercury in the fathers’ urine before pregnancy.

Studies have found that mercury accumulates in the ovaries and testes, inhibits enzymes necessary for sperm production, affects DNA in sperm, causes aberrant numbers of chromosomes in cells, and causes chromosome breaks—all of which can cause infertility, spontaneous abortions, or birth defects. Sub-fertile males in Hong Kong were found to have 40% more mercury in their hair than fertile controls. Infertile males with abnormal semen and infertile females with unexplained infertility also had higher blood mercury concentrations than their fertile counterparts. The number of amalgam fillings was found to be an important factor in success of treating male infertility. From clinical experience, some of the symptoms of mercury sensitivity/mercury poisoning include frequent urination.

Studies in monkeys have found decreased sperm motility, abnormal sperm, increased infertility and abortions at low levels of methylmercury. Mercury causes infertility.
A study by a neuroscience researcher found a connection between the levels of pituitary hormone lutropin and chronic mercury exposure. The authors indicated that inorganic mercury binding to luteinizing hormone can impair gonadotropin regulation affecting fertility and reproductive function.

The normalization of pituitary function also often normalizes menstrual cycle problems, endometriosis, and increases fertility. In addition to having estrogenic effects, mercury has other documented hormonal effects including effects on the reproductive system resulting in lowered sperm counts, defective sperm cells, damaged DNA, aberrant chromosome numbers rather than the normal 46, chromosome breaks, and lowered testosterone levels in males and menstrual disturbances and infertility in women.

3-sperms

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