FLUORIDES AND ANIMALS INCLUDING OUR PETS

Aquatic organisms living in soft waters may be more adversely
affected by 
fluoride pollution than those living in hard or
seawaters because the bioavailability of fluoride
ions is reduced with increasing
water hardness…

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See The Forty One + Links Below ↓

Alligators -

Ants,  |  Fish,  |  Australian Lung Fish,  |  Caddis Fly,

Caimans,  |  Camels,  |  Cattle,   |   Chinchillas,  |  Daphnia,

  Deer, |  Dogs 1, |  Dogs 2,  |  Ducks |  Elephants 1,  |  Elephants 2 , 

Fresh Water Fish,  |  Frogs 1,  |  Frogs 2,  |  Frogs 3 |  Geese, |  Goats,

 Guinea pigs ♦ see  below,  |   Horses,  |  Honey Bees,  |  Kangaroos,

Lizards
,  |  Sheep,  |  Starling control, |  Silver Foxes, |  Snails 1,

Snails 2,  |  Rats 1,  |  Rats 2,  |  Rats 3 Research-1934,

Tadpoles 1,  |  Tadpoles Chinese research 2,

Zebrafish, |  Pigs,  |  Dromedary camels  

RACEHORSES (DEATHS)

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Fluoride associated with fetal malformation in the 1940s.

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Zebrafish and Fluoride

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See also: THE DISAPPEARING SPARROW & FLUORIDES

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Cesium Contamination- Bluefin tuna-Fukushima
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Fluoride & 1080 – Sodium fluoroacetate ← Your pet dog

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Industrial Fluoride Pollution YouTube    (Cattle)

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This is very comprehensive  ↓ ↓ ↓ – but disturbing 

Insects, birds, animals, humans and insecticides

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EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC FLUORIDE POLLUTION ON LIZARDS – E. AUST.

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Extract: ‘The Complete Dinosaur’ + info from China

 Yes they suffered from fluorosis!

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FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES AND FISHES

     ❝…Aquatic organisms living in soft waters may be more adversely affected by fluoride pollution than those living in hard or seawaters because the bioavailability of fluoride ions is reduced with increasing water hardness.
Fluoride can either inhibit or enhance the population growth of algae, depending upon fluoride concentration, exposure time and algal species. Aquatic plants seem to be effective in removing fluoride from contaminated water under laboratory and field conditions.
In aquatic animals, fluoride tends to be accumulated in the exoskeleton of invertebrates and in the bone tissue of fishes.

The toxic action of fluoride resides in the fact that fluoride ions act as enzymatic poisons, inhibiting enzyme activity and, ultimately, interrupting metabolic processes such as glycolysis and synthesis of proteins.

Fluoride toxicity to aquatic invertebrates and fishes increases with increasing fluoride concentration, exposure time and water temperature, and decreases with increasing intraspecific body size and water content of calcium and chloride. Freshwater invertebrates and fishes, especially net-spinning caddis fly larvae and upstream-migrating adult salmons, appear to be more sensitive to fluoride toxicity than estuarine and marine animals. Because, in soft waters with low ionic content, a fluoride concentration as low as 0.5 mg F-/l can adversely affect invertebrates and fishes, safe levels below this fluoride concentration are recommended in order to protect freshwater animals from fluoride pollution…❞

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Fluoridation MAY have implications for the Australian Lungfish
Neoceratodus forsteri, a protected species, which inhabit
the Wivenhoe Dam, if recycled water
is returned to this dam.

We do NOT have Greywater in Queensland only Blackwater.

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Is any of this  toxic to coral ?

We think so.

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Foods that contain Fluoride

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ANADROMOUS SALMON

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Professor Paul Engelking says fish and fluoride don’t mix


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…But technically speaking, the tadpoles didn’t die of “mercury poisoning”
or “cadmium poisoning,” or “hydrofluoric acid” poisoning.
They died because the chemicals ‘wrecked’ their
immune systems leaving the tadpoles 
vulnerable to all the germs and
parasites in their environment…

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Fluoride Vol.27 No.4 220-226 1994
http://sonic.net/kryptox/environ/salmon.htm 

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 http://www.sonomacountygazette.com/cms/pages/sonoma-county-news-article-2262.html

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  Effects of Sodium Fluoride on Carp and Rainbow Trout by K.S. Pillai and

Fluorides MAY explain some of the fingerling problems with
Australian Bass (Macquaria novemaculeata)

Fluoride can either inhibit or enhance the population growth of algae,
depending upon the fluoride concentration…
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British Patent GB 8236; filed 18th April 1896:
‘Fluorine  compounds for the purpose of destroying insects.’

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HONEY BEES

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     Colony Collapse Disorder:

   ↓   The Bee Holocaust   ↓    

www.forbiddenknowledgetv.com/page/5852.html  (BBC 4)

NO MYSTERY HERE !
IN 2009, CHINA BANNED FIPRONIL PRODUCTS
CITING TOXICITY TO BEES

Fipronil (Manufactured by Bayer) is highly toxic for bees *, crustaceans, insects and zooplankton, as well termites, rabbits, the fringe-toed lizard  and certain groups of gallinaceous birds. It appears to reduce the longevity and fecundity of female braconid parasitoids.

 Fipronil -Fluocyanobenpyrazole, C12H4Cl2F6N4OS,  is a slow-acting FLUORIDE BASED POISON.
It is a broad spectrum insecticide that disrupts the insect central nervous system by blocking the passage of chloride ions through the
 GABA receptor and glutamate receptor I(GluCl), components of the central nervous system. This causes hyperexcitation of contaminated insects’ nerves and muscles.

 Seeds treated with Fipronil, produce flowers
toxic to the bee’s brain — They get lost going home !

see also:

  EPA THINKS A PIECE OF PAPER WILL SAVE BEES FROM PESTICIDES

 Henry Miller has been exposed as a science fraud
and professional liar who shills for Monsanto.

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'MONSANTO'

See Film Below 3

 Monsanto Caused 291,000 Suicides In India  

 ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑

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At-a-glance: from  Mecola.com

  • Monsanto is boasting its partnership with 4-H Youth Development Organization, the country’s largest and most influential youth organization with more than 6.8 million members in 80 countries worldwide

  • According to the annual reports, 4-H is receiving funding from Monsanto, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Cargill, DuPont, United Soybean Board, Coca-Cola, and Pfizer

  • Monsanto has been hijacking society at every turn, including government institutions, colleges and universities, media agencies, and so-called representatives of “science”

  • Monsanto recently attempted to brainwash young children with a 16-page book called ““Biotechnology Basics Activity Book” full of colorful pages and cartoon characters touting the “benefits” of GMO

Strong evidence also suggests ‘Neonicotinoid Pesticides

Manufactured by Bayer, is also a major bee killer.

France will outlaw this soon.

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NON-TOXIC ALTERNATIVES for eradicating insect infestations in grains
and museum objects can be oxygen depriving gases such as nitrogen or
carbon dioxide, the later being used in sailing ships of old, – a lighted
candle placed in the grain barrel prior to it being sealed up.
No need for poison sprays, food irradiation, fluorides, or bromides etc.
     - Simple safe and cheap, (but not patentable!).

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FIPRONIL IS HIGHLY TOXIC TO MANY FISH.

EuropeanCommission

Fipronil - (Contains Fluoride )
It is used in Australia to spray locusts.

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Animal Justice Party 

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TERMIDOR

‘Termidor’ (Fipronil) is also used against termites.

Fipronil is broad spectrum insecticide that disrupts the insect central nervous system 
by causing hyper excitation of nerves and muscles. Fipronil is a slow acting poison. 
|When mixed with a bait, it allows the poisoned insect time to
return to the colony and kill other insects
in the same nesting site.

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FLUPYRADIFURONE-Yet Another Bee Killer

THE NEW ‘F’ WORD

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Image of two dogs

Frontline image

‘FRONTLINE’ for fleas, on pets contains Fipronil (Fluoride)

   http://termiteuniversity.com/Chandler.pdf  

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Fluoride and 1080 – Sodium fluoroacetate

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Fluoride Toothpaste – Pet Dogs – RSPCA – UK

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Dogs and fluoride toothpaste-a no no!

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Australian native wild animals are somewhat F. tolerant. 1080 (Sodium fluoroacetate) is used to kill dingos (dogs) (not strictly native to Australia). Mammalian animals including humans suffering with severe fluorosis, yield milk with a VERY low levels of fluoride. — ‘Nature protects her young’ —

Fluoride Toxicity in Domestic and Wild Animals

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Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/pdfplus/10.3109/15563657208990999

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MICE EXPOSED TO ARSENIC SUSCEPTIBLE TO INFLUENZA

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SULFOXAFLOR  a systemic insecticide which acts as an 
insect neurotoxin and is a member a class of
chemicals called sulfoximines which act on
the central nervous system of insects.
[Including BEES]

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THE DISAPPEARING HOUSE SPARROW

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More info on  →  Daphnia and Fluoride
Sometimes Daphnia may be used in certain environments

to test the effects of toxins on an ecosystem, which
makes them an indicator genus …

Daphnia

Credit photo to  http://www.arkive.org/about/contact.html

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FISH LICE COULD BE EARLY INDICATORS OF METAL POLLUTION IN FRESHWATER

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FLUORIDE IN PET FOOD:
Extract from:

Manataka American Indian Council™
Fluoride – dangerously high levels found in pet food

By Melissa Solis – Houston Pet Care Examiner

Pet food has a new level of danger hiding behind its labels. Environmental Working Group (EWG) just released a new study that showed high levels of fluoride in eight of ten pet foods tested. Consuming fluoride can lead to many serious health concerns.

Three studies show that boys who drink fluoridated tap water between the ages of 6 and 8 face a heightened risk of osteosarcoma, the rare but deadly form of bone cancer associated with fluoride (Bassin 2006; Cohn 1992; DHHS 1991). Scientists suspect that boys’ rapid growth may make them more susceptible to bone cancer (Bassin 2006)

OSTEOSARCOMA IS THE MOST COMMON PRIMARY BONE TUMOUR IN DOGS;  it is estimated to occur in over 8,000 dogs each year in the U.S., primarily in larger breeds (Chun 2003; Dernell 2001; Priester 1980; Withrow 1991). According to a recent expert review, the actual incidence is probably higher, since not all cases are confirmed and registered (Mueller 2007). Large dogs with fast growing bones are especially at risk. Only 5% of all osteosarcomas develop in dogs weighing less than 30 pounds and giant dogs generally develop osteosarcoma at a younger age compared to smaller-sized dogs and (Cooley 1997; Misdorp 1979).

A dog drinking adequate water would be exposed to 0.05-0.1 mg fluoride per kg of body weight daily, depending on the dog’s water consumption. A 10-pound puppy that eats about a cup of dog food a day would ingest approximately 0.25 mg fluoride/kg body weight/day based on average fluoride content in the 8 contaminated brands tested by EWG. At that rate, the puppy would consume 2.5 times more fluoride than EPA’s legal limit in drinking water.

When fluoride in drinking water is taken into consideration, a 10-pound puppy would be exposed to 3.5 times more fluoride than EPA allows in drinking water. Large breed puppies may be exposed to even more fluoride…

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This research was carried out by the
Queensland Government in 1952

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  FLUOROSIS OF SHEEP IN QUEENSLAND  

↑  Full text – Three small books – Original Government research.  ↑

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    COMMONWEALTH of AUSTRALIA

Melbourne. 1938

BULLETIN NO. 121 Observations on the Toxicity of Fluorine for Sheep

     CSIRO was original formed in 1926 as CSIR
(Council for Scientific and Industrial Research)

MINERAL DEFICIENCIES & EXCESSES IN CATTLE & SHEEP IN BRITAIN

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— P.T.F.E. —

( The F. is for fluoride )

Perfluoro-octanoic acid (PFOA), an ingredient of Teflon and also known as ‘C-8’,
is a suspected carcinogen now found in humans, other animals and plants.
PFOA is very persistent. Released into the environment it looks as if it
will take literally millions of years to biodegrade.

Credit-to-Mercola

Teflon – The Devil We Know 

Just get rid of the non-stick fry pan...

       →  YOUR PET BIRD COULD COME TO A STICKY END  

PET BIRDS CAN DIE AN EXTREMELY PAINFUL AND AGONIZING
DEATH WHEN EXPOSED TO FUMES FROM HEATED TEFLON

See also:

Merck Veterinary Manual

Dupont- Deadly Ch.

Teflon Cookware (contains Fluoride)

 polytetraflouethylene (PTFE).

“Like so many products developed for the sake of convenience  without concern for human health,
 Teflon coated non-stick cookware when heated has proven to be a primary source of a dangerous toxic fluoride derivative, specifically perfluorinated chemicals”

The chemical industry doesn’t want you to be afraid of Teflon pans, but you should be.

.

PTFE is odorless and invisible and bioaccumulates. When heated above 260ºC it is lethal to birds (pets) and will give humans flu like symptoms. A Teflon pan reached 721°F in just five minutes as measured by a commercially available infrared thermometer.  However safe alternatives are now now available (from their web site):

 CeraMax Ceramic cookware is forged with a super-efficient thermal conductive base which instantly radiates heat throughout the entire pan in seconds.100% PTFE and PFOA free Ordinary non-stick pans often contain the chemical compounds PTFE and PFOA in their coatings. These chemicals can alter the original taste of your food and can even release toxins into your food..

See also  → “Dump Dangerous Pots and Pans Laced With Cancer-Causing Chemicals”

.
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Problems with fire fighting chemicals

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IN CASE YOU MISSED IT   ABC News-Impacts of PFOS and PFOA 

It was revealed in September 2015 [This problem will be here for a long time.]

 the chemicals had leaked from Williamtown Air Force base into ground and surface water, prompting bans on bore water and closing fishing grounds. ”Stop trying to downplay the seriousness of this issue. They are incredibly serious toxins, and it is a real worry for those people living around them.-” Mariann Lloyd-Smith, National Toxics Network senior advisor. - The New South Wales Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has started a statewide investigation into the historical use of the firefighting foam.

Editors comment:
The RAAF once used harmless environmentally friendly fermented blood
and bone,
 and liquorice to make fire fighting foam, – it made the plants grow fast…

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Toxic Flame Retardants

PROBLEMS WITH FIRE RETARDANTS

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Cesium Contamination- Bluefin tuna-Fukushima

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THE DISAPPEARING SPARROW & FLUORIDES

   Guinea pigs have a requirement for vitamin C,
because they can not cannot manufacture or store vitamin C.
(Lack of the enzyme L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase).
(THE SAME AS US HUMANS)

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$cience is slow to progress:

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MINERAL DEFICIENCIES AND EXCESSES IN CATTLE AND SHEEP IN BRITAIN

Mineral Deficiencies And Excesses

In Cattle and Sheep In Britain

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   Link to original web site if it still exists.  

by 

Ruth Allcroft, Senior Research Officer, Veterinary Laboratory,

Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries And Food,

Weybridge, Surrey, England

Although the production of good pasture is a starting point,

one end point is a prime, healthy animal.

At Weybridge, we have many animal health problems associated wrth the grazing of apparently good pastures, and it is some of these problems that I propose to discuss this afternoon:

FLUORINE

The problem of fluorosis in farm animals in Britain is not due to the high fluorine content of rock phosphate deposits, volcanic soils, or water supplies, but arises from the emission of fluorine containing gases and dusts from industrial plants. If the density of our industrial areas is considered in relation to the relatively small area of the whole country, it can be readily understood that a great deal of agricultural land must be adjacent to industrial works.

The chief sources of fluorine contamination of grassland and crops are:

(1) steel and metal works when the method of production involves the use of large amounts of fluorspar as a flux;

(2) brickworks, where the source is usually the local clay, although coal is sometimes a contributory factor;

(3) production of aluminium by the electrolytic reduction of alumina;

(4) glass, enamel, and colour works where fluorine compounds are often added to facilitate melting and to give the finished products certain properties ;

(5) the calcining of iron-stone where the sourtie is mainly the fluorine-rich ore itself;

(6) potteries and other ceramic industries where the materials used in manufacture are high in fluorine;

(7) collieries, power stations and other industries which consume large quantities of pulverised low-grade coal with a high fluorine content.

It is generally accepted that the fluorine content of most plants, with the exception of the roots, is not readily affected by the amount of fluorine in the soil. There seem to be a few exceptions to this, not- ably the tea plant. and the camellia, which appear to be fluorine collectors, but common fluorine values for

The chief chemical sign of fluorosis in severely affected cattle is lameness, which is frequently associated with marked skeletal abnormalities such as an increase in diameter of bones and well defined exostoses. Enlargement and gross exostoses in bovine limb bones (left) compared with normal bones -(right).

uncontaminated animal foodstuffs lie between 1 and 10 p.p.m. on a dry matter basis. Excessively high values’ up to 2000 p.p.m. have been reported (Green 1946) on herbage near sources of emission of fluorine compounds. Herbage and soil samples provide useful corroboration, but are not suitable alone for assessing degree and extent of contamination, since results will depend on climatic conditions around the time of sampling, on the direction of the prevailing winds, and on the topography of the surrounding terrain. It is difficult to suggest a minimum fluorine value for contaminated pastures at which clinical cases of fluorosis will occur, because of the variable factors first mentioned, and because the all-important factor is the length of time over which the foodstuff is consumed at any particular level of contamination. And since development of clinical symptoms is slow, a pasture analysis only demonstrates that contamination is present;

it cannot give a direct correlation of the degree of fluorosis in the animal.

Present evidence suggests that the order of susceptibility of farm animals to fluorosis is calves, dairy cows, other bovines, sheep, pigs, horses, and poultry, but this order may be revised when comparative tests on a known and comparable body weight intake have been carried out, The chief clinical ,symptom in severely affected cattle is lameness, and it is this which usually suggests the possibility of fluorosis and leads to a closer investigation of the herd. The lameness is frequently associated with marked skeletal abnormalities such as an increase in diameter of limb bones and welldefined exostoses. Dental lesions in the permanent teeth of cattle reared on affected farms are one of the best indications of the presence and degree of fluorosis. They include loss of lustre, pitting, staining in parts of the defective enamel, and excessive and irregular wear. Clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by determination of the fluorine content of urine and bone samples.

Although the total economic loss due to fluorosis is not great when considered in relation to that.caused by the major transmissible diseases, it is a matter of serious concern in affected areas and methods of control are being studied both by industry and agriculture. Reduction of emission can be achieved to some extent in some industries by trapping and washing the dusts and gases, but in others the practical difficulties and the costs would be so great that it is unlikely that efficient devices could be installed. Some degree of agricultural control can be achieved by farming with the fluorine hazard in view, e.g., improvement of pas- ture management, limitation of grazing periods; keep- ing pigs and poultry instead of cattle and sheep, or using the land for production of crops only. The possibility of alleviating the effects of fluorosis in cattle by feeding certain mineral supplements is also being investigated by the Ministry on an experimental farm on which fluorosis occurs.

REFERENCES:

Allcroft, R. Proc. XV Int. Vet. Congr., Stockholm, Vol. I, Pt. 1, pp. 573. 1953.

Allcroft R. Vet. Rec., Vol. 66, pp. 517. 1954.
Allcroft, R., and Lewis, G. Proc. 7th Int. Grassland Congr., N.Z.

(in press). 1956.
Allcroft, R., Scarnell, J., and Hignett, S. L. Vet. Rec., Vol. 66,

pp. 367. 1954.
Allcroft, W. M. Vet. J.. Vol. 103, pp. 75. 1947.
Bartlett, S., Brown, B. ‘B., Foot, A. S:, Rowland, S. J., Allcroft

R., and Parr, W. H. Br. Vet. J., Vol. 110, pp. 3. 1954. Blaxter, K. L.; and McGill, R. F: Vet. Revs. and Annot., Vol. 2,

pp. 35. 1956.
Blaxter, K. L., and Sharman, G. A. M. ,Vet. Rec., Vol. 67;‘ pp.

108. 1955.
Breirem, K., Ender, F., Halse, K., and Slagsvold, L. Acta Agr.

Suecana, Vol. 3, pp. 89. 1949.
Cunningham, I. J. N.Z. J. Sci. Tech, Vol. 17, pp. 775. 1936. Cunningham, I. J. N.Z. J. Agric;, Vol. 90, pp. 196. 1.955. Dick, A. T. Aust. Vet. J., Vol. 29, pp. 233. 1953.
Dick, A. T. Aust. Vet. J., Vol. 30, pp. 197. 1954.
Ferguson, W. S., Lewis, A. H., and Watson, S. J. J. .Agr. Sci.,

Vol. 33, pp. 44. 1943.
Green,-H. H. Proc. Roy. Soc…Med., Vol. 39, pp. 795. ..1946. Green, H. H. N.V.M.A. Publ. NO. 17, pp. .60. 1948.
Jam?;;;, S., and Harbour, H. E. Vet. Rec., Vol. 59, pp. 102.

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McElroy, W. D.; and Glass, B., eds. Symposium on Copper Metabolism, pp. 246-270. Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, 1950.

Osb&& A. D., Featherstone, J., and Herdan, G. Vet. Rec., Vol.. 66, pp. .409, 1954.

Parr, W. H., and Allcroft, R. Unpublished data. 1956. Patterson, J. B. E. Nature, Vol. 157, pp. 555. 1946. Shand, A. B.V.A. Publ. No. 23, pp. 58. 1952.
Stewart, J. Guernsey Breeders’ J., Vol. 7, pp. 43. 1953. Stewart, J. Scot. Agric., Vol. 34, pp. 68. 1954.

Stewart, J., Mitchell, R.L., and Stewart, A. B. Emp. J. Exp.

Agr., Vol. 14, pp. 145. 1946.
Stewart, J., and Reith, J. W. S. J; Comp. Path., Vol. 66,

_ PP. 1.

1956.
Swan, J. B., and Jamieson, N. D. N.Z. J. Sci. Tech. *(in II Iress).

195G.

DISCUSSION

Col. Stafford, Springston: You have just listened to the most lucid speech on the deficiencies. of a number’ of elements which are essential to animal life. Now it has been stated that the nH of a good nasture soil.runs between 6.5 and 7. I can oniy give you a-little .of my own experience; once you get the pH over 7, as you do where lime has been put on the land in excess, then you get disastrous results in ,bone formation, especially in young stock. I must congratulate the speaker on a wonderful paper.

Q. Does Dr Allcroft know of any cases where farmers whose stock have been affected by fluorosis obtained compensation against the particular industrial enterprise which has been the cause of it?

A. Do you mean as a result of a legal claim or do you mean as a result of private negotiations between farmer and industry?

Q. I am concerned with’ the common law right.

A. I do know of cases. Some industries do, by private arrangement, pay compensation to farmers whose land is -adjacent and is severely contaminated.

Q. What is the reason for the incidence of increased grass staggers on pastures fertilised with nitrogen in the early ipring ?

A. We have no explanation. The increased incidence is not only confined to pastures treated with nitrogen. We have found that by topdressing those. pastures with magnesite it increases the magnesium uptake. of the pasture. The incidence of staggers has been reduced but the incidence cannot be correlated with magnesium content alone, although it was beneficial in the cases we tried.

Q. if crops are grown where there is fluorine contamination do they take up the fluorine and pass the trouble on to somebody else ?

A. No, it is not a case of passing it on to somebody else. It has been shown that most plants do not take up fluorine from the soil. There are two exceptions: the tea plant and the camellia which appear to be fluorine collectors. Most grasses and root crops do not take:it up from soils. It is mostly a question of. contamination of the surface;, there- fore humans get off lightly because we do not eat grass. The inner parts of cabbages and similar. crops are not high in fluorine, only the outer coverings which are .removed. Cereal grains are also quite safe.

Is fluorine cumulative ? Can small quantities be safely absorbed over long periods or will they produce clinical symptoms ? It is sometimes the practice to add fluorine to drinking water.

Yes, it is cumulative, but if the intake is sn~all~animals cattle do seem to be able to stand considerable amounts without any adverse clinical symptoms at all. If they are continually exposed to it there will be a gradual build-up to three or four thousand parts per million. A concentration of five to six hundred parts per million is normal. It usually takes several years before you get clinical symptoms, then they first show as dental lesions.

Short of clinical symptoms such as swayback are young sheep affected by a deficiency of copper ?

I do not think so; we have not associated any. loss of con- dition in young sheep with copper deficiency.

How and when were the magnesites and dolomites applied to the pastures ?

The magnesite was applied during the spring. The dolo- mite we have applied on two occasions, one in the autumn and the other in the spring. We found on some plots that just one application in spring-February-March-was quite sufficient.

Were the copper injections to cattle as satisfactory as the application of copper to pasture; also if they are satisfactory are they satisfactory in the case of molybdenum excess as well as simply copper deficiency? or

We do not usually apply copper to the pastures. It is normally always given as oral supplement or intravenous injection; in sheep always as oral supplement. We have tried an application of copper sulphate to cattle pasture in peaty areas in Scotland and found the effect wore off after six months. Most farmers prefer oral supplements or intravenous injections rather than topdressing of pastures. They are apprehensive about using copper for top- dressing pastures because of the toxicity to sheep. Assuming that all our pastures where copper deficiency occurs are used both for cattle and sheep grazing we have not pushed the use’of copper sulphate on pastures.

H. van Rensburg: Would water containing more than 30 parts per million of fluorine have detrimental effects on cattle, and how soon ? The problem occurs in Tanganyika where we have very high percentages of fluorine in the water and would like to hold young cattle -on the areas for 6-18 months. How long could we safely keep them there?

Dr Allcroft : With 30 parts per million in the drinking water you would get clinical effects if you keep them there for 18 months. You could expect to get severe dental lesions in the permanent teeth when they came through. If they were then removed and spent the rest of their lives away from it, they might not be so bad, but still there would be harmful effects. Do you have to keep them there that length of time?

H. van Rensburg: We have not kept them in this specific area for any length of time,. but in other areas. where~there is a high fluorine content in the water it is very noticeable amongst stock -and humans that their teeth are severely affected. Conditions I am referring to would only apply to cattle afterwards drafted to market for slaughter.

See also → www.eblex.org.uk

Reproduced by

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FLUORINE TOXICITY FOR SHEEP CSIRO BULLETIN No. 121.

FLUORIDE TOXICITY FOR SHEEP – CSIRO BULLETIN No. 121

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COMMONWEALTH of AUSTRALIA

Melbourne. 1938

    CSIRO was original formed in 1926 as CSIR
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

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 We are sorry that the full text is no longer available.

HOWEVER TRY → HERE

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FLUOROSIS OF SHEEP IN QUEENSLAND

The lethal dose of NaF (an artificial fluoride) is 50 times smaller than
that of CaF2 (the naturally-occurring fluoride) – Dr. Hardy Limeback,
Biochemist and Professor of Dentistry, University of Toronto, 
former consultant to the Canadian Dental Association.

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THE DISAPPEARING SPARROW AND FLUORIDES +

Oil companies convinced us that unleaded petrol is safer for
our health and the environment than leaded petrol.
By their failure to disclose ALL the facts, we seem
to have been seriously conned – yet again!

‘Silent Spring’ See further down the page. ↓

Sparrows in mining towns Broken Hill & Mount Isa- Lead

The Disappearing Sparrow and Fluorides

Two sparrows fThe House Sparrow - Passer domesticus

One of the most familiar birds on earth, it is common with an immense natural range that stretches from the west coast of Ireland to the east coast of Siberia, north to the arctic Circle and South to North Africa, the middle East, India and Sri Lanka. It has also been introduced to North and South America, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, one of the most widespread of all birds. The house Sparrows are believed to have become associated with humans around 10,000 years ago.        

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- The 20 March is World Sparrow Day -

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Neonicotinoid & Fipronil TALL

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 It would be an irony if the introduction of  lead-free petrol  were
behind the disappearance from cities of the world of the
house sparrow, the world’s most familiar bird… 
 -  In Most Countries The House Sparrow Is Not Protected  -

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 ”UNLEADED PETROL DID NOT DO THE TRICK”

Some researchers question whether leaded petrol really was the principal
source of  lead poisoning, the reason given for the move to unleaded petrol.

   Research in Frankfurt found that reducing the lead content of leaded petrol by two thirds for five years made no difference to lead levels in the blood

   Australia‘s National Energy Advisory Committee reported that  ”no single case of clinical lead poisoning has ever been demonstrated to be due to automobile emissions of airborne lead”

  Professor Lowthur of the University of London pointed out that the lead in car emissions settled as a very heavy dust at the edge of roads. It doesn’t get absorbed through the lungs and doesn’t even get dissolved in the diluted hydrochloric acid of the stomach

   Professor Roger Perry of Imperial College, London explained that lead levels in blood were not related just to leaded petrol, but also to lead in paint, water, dust, and solder. He held that lead in our water and in the solder used to make tin cans was the major cause. He also stated that lead levels in the blood fell consistently since 1935, at the same time as the use of leaded petrol was increasing…

 Lead-free petrol contains   Three Suspicious Chemicals  

that may be responsible either in part, or in combination
for this world-wide mystery of :

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THE DISAPPEARING HOUSE SPARROW 

( And may be us ! )

1)  MTBE Methyl tert-Butyl Ether  - 

C5-H12-O US Pat. 5336841 –

April 1993 – Chemical Research & Licensing Company Warning:
The Lc50 Values Hereunder Are Estimated
On The Basis Of A 4-Hour Exposure.
Acute Oral Toxicity (LD50): 4000 mg/kg [Rat].
Acute toxicity of the vapor (LC50): 23576 ppm 4 hour(s) [Rat].
Chronic Effects on Humans:
The substance is toxic to lungs, the nervous system, mucous membranes…

2)  BENZENE Benzol; Benzine
, C6-H6

Benzene is a colourless and highly flammable liquid with a sweet smell. It is mainly used as a precursor to heavy chemicals, such as ethylbenzene and cumene, which are produced on a billion kilogram scale. Because it has a high octane number, it is an important component of gasoline, composing a few percent of its mass. Most non-industrial applications have been limited by benzene’s carcinogenicity.  (benzene, toluene, xylene, ect.) 

Special Remarks on Chronic Effects on Humans:
passes the placental barrier, detected in maternal milk.
May cause adverse reproductive effects (female fertility,
Embryotoxic and/or foetotoxic in animal) and birth defects.
May affect genetic material (mutagenic).
May cause cancer (tumorigenic, leukemia))

3)  Olefines-organic compounds which have double bonds.
      After combustion, one critical by-product is 1,3-butadiene.


THREE SUSPICIOUS INSECTICIDES:

Fipronil, Neonicotinoid and Anvil 

A)  Fipronil (fluoride) is a broadspectrum insecticide that disrupts the insect central nervous system by blocking the passage of chloride ions through the GABA receptor and glutamate receptor. Seeds treated with Fipronil produce flowers toxic to a bee’s brain — They get lost going home !

B)  Neonicotinoid Following the publication of several studies that show neonicotinoid pesticides have a negative impact on dwindling honey bee populations.

C) Anvil InsecticideResmethrin and sumithrin, synthetic pyrethroid insecticides, are registered with the Environmental Protection Agency for use in mosquito control. While some experts claim they are not toxic to humans, they are considered particularly extremely toxic to fish and will not be sprayed in lakes, ponds or other areas where live fish may be exposed. 

In some people, allergic responses to pyrethroids have been reported. There are also indications that pyrethroids as a class may interfere with the immune and endocrine systems. Other adverse chronic effects, including effects on the liver and thyroid, have been reported in toxicology testing.

We humans may now be too efficient at killing insects -
The sparrows may be poisoned, hungry, or homeless:

  fluoride for starling control  

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Sodium Fluoroacetate 

  1080 and Birds  

The new process for making unleaded petrol involves using

  Hydrogen Fluoride  

- …to achieve high octane ratings without adding lead.
However HF is one of the most corrosive chemicals in existence,
capable of eating away at glass and dissolving most metals.
Dr. Jag Cook, from Britain’s National Chemical Emergency Group
which is responsible for mopping up any major toxic spills in the UK said:

 Hydrogen fluoride is about the only chemical that frightens me.

                             Watch ↑  ↑  ↑
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LEAD IN AVIATION FUEL

 Lead is still in aviation gasoline ! See above ↑

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Sparrows spend a lot of time at low elevations – on pavements and in grasses, may be these chemicals are more concentrated near the ground?  Swallows, which feed on insects and stay on the wing longer and higher, are showing no sign of decline in our city, but I seldom see a sparrow now, (Brisbane, Queensland). However recently March/April 2014 I observed them at Kota Kinabalu, Shanghai and Hong Kong, - also sightings in Bali – Jan. 2015 and Melbourne Oct. 2015. and more recently Bundaberg Queensland. – Let us hope this is a sign of recovery.

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Calling Sparrows Back To Our Courtyards

The issue of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) disappearing from big cities, including Delhi, has been a cause of concern for environmentalist and wildlife lovers for quite a while now.Though there is no official data on the number of sparrows left in India, the population of the small birds has declined the world over. As part of a campaign to save the common house sparrow,
the Delhi government recently declared it the State Bird.
Recognising the decline in the number of sparrows in the City, the Delhi Government accorded this status to common bird along with launching a campaign ‘Rise for the Sparrows’ to connect people from all walks of life to save this humble, unassuming species. The founder of Nature Forever Society, Mohammed Dilawar, who has been working specifically on this campaign for over a year and around seven years for increasing their numbers in general, says declaring house sparrow as the state bird will send out a significant message among both – the special and the common man. It was high time we did it. Generally, some rare bird is given this status but by declaring a common bird a State Bird will attract everybody’s attention towards the issue,” he says.

Source: Deccan Herald, 15 September 2012

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House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) were introduced to North America after 1850.

They increased and spread up to 1920, and stabilized or decreased thereafter until 1960.
In the Maritimes (and perhaps some other areas), a further decline set in after 1970,
continuing to the present. Now the species is rare to absent in much of the Maritimes,
except around farms with livestock. Decline here since 1970 probably approaches 90 per cent
in most other areas of human settlement except south of 45°N

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URGENT RESEARCH IS NEEDED

Cities of the world have thousands of  vehicles using unleaded fuels: motor cycles, tut tuts, mowers chain saws, and old cars that DO NOT HAVE CATALYTIC CONVERTERSor modern cars that the converters have failed.

Who ever takes on this research needs to be big enough to take on the oil companies. – May be as big as China? Universities can no longer be trusted, they are too dependant on private and corporate funding, as is evidenced by their history on fluoride pollution to date.

Although we will not run out of oil (it is NOT a fossil fuel), may be electric cars will soon take over.

 —  AIRCRAFT & Weather Modification.  —

The most common chemicals used for cloud seeding

include silver iodide and dry ice (solid carbon dioxide).

Why in the world are they spraying?

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  MORE INFO ON CLIMATE CHANGE  

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Other animals sensitive to fluorides

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 Pets birds allergic to cigarette smoke  and (dogs and cats)

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Rachel Carson 1907-1964

“We should no longer accept the counsel of those who tell us that
we must
 
fill our world with poisonous chemicals; we
should look
 
about and see what other course is open
to us. -”
Rachel Carson, Silent Spring, 1962.

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Carson was posthumously awarded the
Presidential Medal of Freedom
by Jimmy Carter.

Presidental Medal of Freedom

Silent Spring

‘Silent Spring’ is an environmental science book written by Rachel Carson
and published in 1962. 
The book documented the detrimental effects
on the environment—particularly on birds—
 of the indiscriminate
use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of

 spreading disinformation and public officials of
accepting
 industry claims unquestioningly.

 

The book sparked major controversy,
selling 65,000 copies in less than two weeks.
Every newspaper in the nation reviewed it.
The commotion reached the nation’s capital,
with President John F. Kennedy agreeing to
look into the side effects of DDT.

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The MIDWAY media project is a powerful visual journey
into the heart of an astonishingly symbolic
environmental tragedy.
On one of the remotest islands on our planet, tens of
thousands of baby albatrosses lie dead on the
ground, their bodies filled with PLASTIC
from the ‘Pacific Garbage Patch’.

http://www.midwayfilm.com/

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